Alice A. Bailey

From Bethlehem to Calvary:

 

p. 25: The initiates of the world are to be found in every nation, in every church, and in every group where men of good will are to be found working, and where world service is rendered. … The best of them [the modern so-called esoteric groups] can only prepare men for that stage in the evolutionary process which is called “discipleship”.

 

p. 29: Spiritual selfishness, which has been such a characteristic of aspirants in the past, has to be transcended and transmuted into love of man and sharing in the “fellowship of Christ’s sufferings”.  Self must be lost to sight in service.  Service is rapidly becoming the keynote of the time, and one of the incentives in racial endeavour.

Some day, sooner perhaps than many may think, the portals of initiation will open wide to the suffering world disciple (as they have ever (p. 30) opened in the past to individuals), and humanity will enter into a new Kingdom …

p. 91: Not only did Christ bridge the gap between the East and the West, summing up in Himself all that the East had of worth to contribute, but He gave to our occidental civilisation (at that time unborn) those great ideals and that example of sacrifice and of service which today (two thousand years after He walked among men) are becoming the keynote of the best minds of the age.     Through His life, He gave to us an idea which became in time the ideal of service, so that today the attention of many rulers and thinkers throughout the world is engrossed with the well-being of nations and men.

p. 102: He [Christ] saw what He had to do—to serve, to suffer and to found the kingdom of God.

 

p. 121: Let that life flow in "more abundantly" upon us and we shall become, as Christ became, living centres of radiant energy for the service of the world.

 

This results in living as Christ lived, with no thought of self but only concern and interest in others.

 

p. 170: One of the strongest arguments for the divine unfoldment of man is the emergence on a large scale of this tendency to serve.   But to the man who seeks to follow Christ, and who aims eventually at climbing the Mount of Transfiguration, service leads inevitably to increased illumination, and illumination in its turn must find its expression in renewed and consecrated service, and thus we find our way—through service to our fellowmen—into the Way that Christ trod. Following in His steps, we achieve eventually the power to live as illumined and Christlike men and women in our normal everyday surroundings.

 

p. 197: One wonders sometimes what the world would have been like today if the exponents of the Christian faith had occupied themselves with the theme of love and loving service instead of with this constantly reiterated emphasis upon the blood sacrifice and upon the wickedness of man.

 

p. 206: Christ's major task was the establishing of God's kingdom upon earth.    But the way is found in service to our fellowmen, and Christ's death, viewed from one angle, was the logical outcome of the service which He had rendered.

 

p. 206: It is through supreme service and sacrifice that we become followers of Christ and earn the right to enter into His kingdom, because we do not enter alone.

 

p.208: It has taken us twenty centuries to begin to understand Him and His mission and career.    He started out to serve humanity, and to teach and preach the good tidings of the kingdom of God. That was His theme, and we have forgotten it and have preached the Personality of Jesus Christ—one theme which He Himself ignored and which seemed to Him of small importance in view of the greater values involved.

 

p. 210: The way into that kingdom is the way that Christ trod. It involves the sacrifice of the personal self for the good of the world, and the service of humanity instead of the service of one's own desires.

 

p. 211: Christ died in order to bring to our notice that the way into the kingdom of God was the way of love and of service.

 

p. 223: The boundary between the world and the kingdom was clearly defined. He had given us an example of service unparalleled in history. He had shown us the way that we should go.

 

p. 225: He came to found, or to materialise upon the earth, the kingdom of God; secondly, to show us what the love of God signified and how it expressed itself in service and in the eternal sacrifice of divinity upon the cross of matter. Christ stood as a symbol and also as an example. He revealed to us God's Mind, and showed us the pattern upon which we should mould our lives.

  The kingdom and the service!    He mounted the Cross and showed us in His sacrifice and example what we had to do.

 

p. 226: The service of the kingdom is our duty and also our method of release from the thralldom of human experience.  We must grasp this; we must realise that we shall find release only in the service of the kingdom.

 

p. 233: Only through love (and service as the expression of love) can the real message of Christ be understood and men pass on towards a joyful resurrection.

 

p. 260: He (Christ) founded the kingdom of God in due time when the human kingdom was reaching maturity. He demonstrated the values of that kingdom in His Own life, portraying for us the character of its citizenship, and He opened the door wide for all who could fit themselves (through service and discipline) to pass out of the human kingdom into the spiritual kingdom.

p. 261: He gave a message which was universal in its implications, for the kingdom of God stands wide open to all who love and serve and who purify the lower nature, irrespective of creed and dogma.

Love, brotherhood, cooperation, service, self-sacrifice, inclusiveness, freedom from doctrine, recognition of divinity—these are the characteristics of the citizen of the kingdom, and these still remain our ideals.

p. 266:   The achievement of human perfection is not the simple matter of building a good character and being nice and kind. More than that is involved. It is a question of understanding and of a new and regulated inner attitude, one which is oriented to God because it is oriented to the service of man, in whom God is expressing Himself.

p. 271: We are human beings, but we are also divine. We are citizens of the kingdom, although we have not yet claimed and entered into our divine heritage. Inspiration is pouring in all the time; love is latent in every human heart. Only obedience is required at the first step, and when that is rendered, service, which is the expression of love, and inspiration, which is the influence of the kingdom, become a definite part of our life expression. This is what Christ came to reveal; it is the Word which He sounded forth. He has demonstrated to us our human and divine possibilities, and by accepting the fact of our dual but divine nature we can begin to aid in the founding and expressing of the kingdom.

 

p. 272: The new religion is on the way, and it is one for which all previous religions have prepared us. It differs only in that it will no longer be distinguished by dogmas and doctrines, but will be essentially an attitude of mind, an orientation to life, to man and to God. It will also be a living service.

 

p. 279: No man who cannot attain to the consciousness of the true values is yet ready for the immortality which is the prerogative of the sons of God. The building of that inner structure which is the spiritual body is carried on by means of purification, perfecting, meditation and initiation, and above all else, by service. There is no other way. The true values to which the initiate gives his life are those of the spirit, of the kingdom of God, those which concern the whole and which lay no primary emphasis upon the individual. They are expressed through expansion, service and conscious incorporation in the whole. They are to be summed up in the one word Service.

 

p. 281: He [Christ] came to found the kingdom of God on earth and to institute a new and tangible expression of Deity upon our planet. His mission has not failed. The kingdom is now organised upon earth and is composed of those men and women everywhere who have lost sight of their own individual salvation and hope of heaven because they know that unless heaven can express itself here and now it is but a futile hope.    they are

satisfied to walk among men as those who serve and who are citizens of the kingdom of God.

 

p. 283: This religious will is in expression now, not turned to theology or to the formation of doctrines and occupied with their enforcement, but to love and service, forgetting self, giving the uttermost that is possible for the helping of the world.

 

p. 284: Christ emphasises the same lesson, and always His disciples have sought, in their place and time, to teach the law of service.

  Sometimes it seems as if the two extremes lived on in the consciousness of man—the notorious and ambitious, and the great world servers. Hitherto the sequence has been: service of ourselves, of our family, of those we love, of some leader, some cause, some school of politics or religion. The time has come when service must expand and express itself on broader and more inclusive lines, and we must learn to serve as Christ served, to love all men as He loved them and, by the potency of our spiritual vitality and the quality of our service, stimulate all we meet so that they too can serve and love and become members of the kingdom. When this is seen clearly, and when we are ready to make the needed sacrifices and renunciations, there will be a more rapid manifestation of the kingdom of God on earth.

p. 266: The achievement of human perfection is not the simple matter of building a good character and being nice and kind. More than that is involved. It is a question of understanding and of a new and regulated inner attitude, one which is oriented to God because it is oriented to the service of man, in whom God is expressing Himself.

p. 267: Theologically, we have said that "God is love," and then have interpreted Him in terms of our own hatreds, our own limited ideals, our narrow theologies, and our separative attitudes.    But we accord no general service, and that quality is not yet the motivating power in the life of the world. It is motivating life more definitely than ever before, but the efforts that are now being made—twenty centuries after Christ left us with the command to follow in His steps—only serve to show how slow we have been, how much remains to be done, and how desperately men need to be served by those who have vision and the love of God in their hearts.

 

p. 270: Such is the goal for the man who seeks to stand with Christ in the founding of the kingdom, thus fulfilling the will of God. There is no other objective worthy of man's attention, nor one which will so absorb every power he has, every gift and talent he possesses, and every moment of his being. Today the call is going forth for Servers of the race, and for men and women who will work at the task of perfecting the self in order that they may be better equipped to serve their fellowmen and God in man.

p. 271: We are citizens of the kingdom, although we have not yet claimed and entered into our divine heritage. Inspiration is pouring in all the time; love is latent in every human heart. Only obedience is required at the first step, and when that is rendered, service, which is the expression of love, and inspiration, which is the influence of the kingdom, become a definite part of our life expression. This is what Christ came to reveal; it is the Word which He sounded forth. 

p. 272: The new religion is on the way, and it is one for which all previous religions have prepared us.  ... It will also be a living service

p. 279: No man who cannot attain to the consciousness of the true values is yet ready for the immortality which is the prerogative of the sons of God. The building of that inner structure which is the spiritual body is carried on by means of purification, perfecting, meditation and initiation, and above all else, by service. There is no other way. The true values to which the initiate gives his life are those of the spirit, of the kingdom of God, those which concern the whole and which lay no primary emphasis upon the individual. They are expressed through expansion, service and conscious incorporation in the whole. They are to be summed up in the one word Service.

p. 281: they are satisfied to walk among men as those who serve and who are citizens of the kingdom of God.

p. 283: This religious will is in expression now, not turned to theology or to the formation of doctrines and occupied with their enforcement, but to love and service, forgetting self, giving the uttermost that is possible for the helping of the world.

 

p. 284

Christ emphasises the same lesson, and always His disciples have sought, in their place and time, to teach the law of service.

  Sometimes it seems as if the two extremes lived on in the consciousness of man—the notorious and ambitious, and the great world servers. Hitherto the sequence has been: service of ourselves, of our family, of those we love, of some leader, some cause, some school of politics or religion. The time has come when service must expand and express itself on broader and more inclusive lines, and we must learn to serve as Christ served, to love all men as He loved them and, by the potency of our spiritual vitality and the quality of our service, stimulate all we meet so that they too can serve and love and become members of the kingdom.


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Emergent Church

  • Dwight J. Friesen in an Emergent Manifesto of Hope, p. 206: When orthopraxy becomes our way of being in the world, the Kingdom of God is manifest.  The very Triune life of God finds Expression in human relations With one another, creation, and God.  To walk in the way of Jesus is to bring the fullness of one's individuated self in humble service of the other.  The hope is not to defeat, debate, condemn, or even convert the other; rather the hope is to live reconciled With the other, not avoiding differences but seeing them as an Expression of the largeness and diverse beauty of God.
  • Will Samsom in an Emergent Manifesto of Hope, p. 161: What if we formed communities and social systems not only to interpret Christ for the larger culture but also to provide “communally authorative rules of discourse, attitude, and action”?

  • Bob Buford in Leadership Network, Compass Magazine May 1995 and  NEXT Dec. 1997. “The Church of the 21st Century is reforming itself into a multi-faceted service operation.”

  • Leonard Sweet in Quantum Spirituality, p. 232: Only when the paranormal and spiritual combine in ways that foster ethical and philosophical development "of the highest order," as metaphysician/author David Spangler puts it, will the differences be illuminated between "psychism and mysticism, information and insight, knowledge and wisdom, and self-development and service."

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    Ellen G. White

    Manuscript Releases Vol 9, p. 81:  29. Evangelistic Methods to which Seventh-day Adventists Are Not Called ... There is such a thing as conducting gospel work in a way that does harm to the workers. This is not the way to accomplish the work that must be done for our world. We are not to follow the methods of the Salvation Army. Preach the truth, then pray the truth. Have more camp meetings to bring the truth before the people in its very simplicity. ...